YCAA Logo
YCAA Logo
The Crab Nebula in Blue and White Credit & Copyright: Jay Gallagher (U. Wisc.),
The Crab Nebula in Blue and White Credit & Copyright: Jay Gallagher (U. Wisc.),
Interstellar Dust-Bunnies of NGC 891 Credit: C. Howk & B. Savage (Wisconsin);
Interstellar Dust-Bunnies of NGC 891 Credit: C. Howk & B. Savage (Wisconsin);
Hubble. Credit: R. Williams (STScI), the Hubble Deep Field-South Team, and NASA
Hubble. Credit: R. Williams (STScI), the Hubble Deep Field-South Team, and NASA
Dumbell. Credit & (c): Michael Pierce (Indiana U.) et al., WIYN, AURA, NOAO, NSF
Dumbell. Credit & (c): Michael Pierce (Indiana U.) et al., WIYN, AURA, NOAO, NSF
Abell 39.    (c): George Jacoby (WIYN Obs.) et al., WIYN, AURA, NOAO, NSF
Abell 39. (c): George Jacoby (WIYN Obs.) et al., WIYN, AURA, NOAO, NSF
Bubbling. Credit: Jeffrey Kenney (Yale) et al., WFPC2, HST NASA
Bubbling. Credit: Jeffrey Kenney (Yale) et al., WFPC2, HST NASA

Mailing Address

Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics
Physics Department
P.O. Box 208120
New Haven, CT 06520-8120

Campus Address

260 Whitney Avenue
454 J.W. Gibbs Laboratory

Telephone: (203) 432-3392

Fax: 203) 432-3824

E-mail: ycaa@yale.edu

Upcoming YCAA Seminars

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Updated: 15 hours 56 min ago

Special YCAA Seminar: "Measuring AGN Inner Structure and General Relativistic Effects with NuStar" Guido Risaliti - Thu, July 17, 2014

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 5:45am
When: Thursday, July 17, 2014 2:00 PM
Where:
   J.W. Gibbs Laboratory, 164 JWG
   260 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT 06520-8120
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
Tags: astrophysics, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Guido Risaliti

Description: Abstract:I will show the latest results from the NuSTAR observing program of bright AGN, focusing on measurements of general relativistic effects. I will show how precise BH spin measurements are possible for AGN with strong reflection continua, with and without simultaneous XMM-Newton observations. I will also discuss some preliminary analysis of the structure and size of the X-ray emitting corona, estimated through self-consistent disk+corona emission models.

Open To: General Public
Contact Information:
   Laurelyn Celone
   
   laurelyn.celone@yale.edu
   

Joint Weak Interaction Discussion Group/Nuclear Particle Astrophysics Seminar: Jeff Cherwinka, University of Wisconsin Physical Sciences Lab, "Building IceCube, A Neutrino Telescope at the South Pole" - Fri, June 13, 2014

Fri, 06/13/2014 - 4:51am
When: Friday, June 13, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Where:
   Sloane Physics Laboratory (SPL), 3rd Floor Lounge
   217 Prospect St., New Haven, CT 06511
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
Tags: astrophysics, interactions, nuclear_physics, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Jeff Cherwinka, University of Wisconsin Physical Sciences Lab

Description: An introduction to the IceCube detector with a layman's view of how it works, and some science topics it was built to address. Building the detector involved instrumenting a cubic kilometer of ice with over 5000 light sensors. Installation of these sensors required drilling 86 holes in the ice 1.5 mile deep to deploy the Digital Optical Modules ~14" in diameter. Details of the drill equipment, drilling operations, and deployment will be described.

Contact Information:
   Karsten Heeger
   
   karsten.heeger@yale.edu
   

Joint Weak Interaction Discussion Group/Nuclear Particle Astrophysics Seminar: Fedor Simkovic, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia, "Massive neutrinos in nuclear processes" - Tue, June 10, 2014

Tue, 06/10/2014 - 4:53am
When: Tuesday, June 10, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Where:
   Sloane Physics Laboratory (SPL), Third Floor Lounge
   217 Prospect St., New Haven, CT 06511
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
Tags: astrophysics, interactions, nuclear_physics, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Fedor Simkovic, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia; BLTP, JINR Dubna, Russia

Description: The properties of neutrinos have been the most important issue in particle physics, astrophysics & cosmology. About 70 years after the discovery of neutrinos we do not know their basic properties, in particular absolute mass, CP properties, magnetic moment, nature (Dirac or Majorana), statistical properties, number of massive neutrinos, etc. The nucleus is a laboratory, which allows us to measure & determine these properties or to establish useful limits on unknown parameters of particle physics side like neutrino masses.

Open To: General Public
Admission: Free
Contact Information:
   Francesco Iachello
   
   francesco.iachello@yale.edu
   

Joint Weak Interaction Discussion Group/Nuclear Particle Astrophysics Seminar: Frank Deppisch, University College London, UK, "Probing Lepton Number Violation on Three Frontiers" - Tue, June 3, 2014

Tue, 06/03/2014 - 5:16am
When: Tuesday, June 3, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Where:
   Sloane Physics Laboratory (SPL), Third Floor Lounge
   217 Prospect St., New Haven, CT 06511
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
Tags: astrophysics, interactions, nuclear_physics, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Frank Deppisch, University College, London

Description: Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

Open To: General Public
Admission: Free
Contact Information:
   Francesco Iachello
   
   francesco.iachello@yale.edu
   

Joint Weak Interaction Discussion Group/Nuclear Particle Astrophysics Seminar: Marco Vignati, Sapienza University of Rome, "CALDER: Cryogenic light detectors for neutrino and dark matter searches" - Fri, May 30, 2014

Fri, 05/30/2014 - 5:24am
When: Friday, May 30, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Where:
   Sloane Physics Laboratory (SPL), 3rd Floor Lounge
   217 Prospect St., New Haven, CT 06511
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
Tags: astrophysics, interactions, nuclear_physics, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Marco Vignati, Sapienza University of Rome

Description: Large-mass arrays of bolometers proved to be good detectors for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0ν2β) and Dark Matter searches. CUORE and LUCIFER are bolometric 0ν2β experiments which will start to take data in 2015 at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. The sensitivity of CUORE could be increased by removing the background due to α particles, by detecting the small amount of Cherenkov light (100 eV) emitted by the βs' signal and not by αs. LUCIFER could be extended to detect also Dark Matter, provided that the background from β/γ particles (100 eV of scintillation light) is discriminated from nuclear recoils of about 10 keV energy (no light). CALDER is a new project to develop light detectors for CUORE, LUCIFER and similar bolometric experiments. The goal is to obtain detectors with an active area of 5x5 cm² (the face of bolometric crystals), operating at 10 mK, and with a baseline resolution better than 20 eV. We have chosen to develop phonon-mediated devices using superconducting MKIDs (Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors). The project started few months ago and we are currently operating the first prototypes.

Contact Information:
   Reina Maruyama
   
   reina.maruyama@yale.edu