YCAA Logo
YCAA Logo
The Crab Nebula in Blue and White Credit & Copyright: Jay Gallagher (U. Wisc.),
The Crab Nebula in Blue and White Credit & Copyright: Jay Gallagher (U. Wisc.),
Interstellar Dust-Bunnies of NGC 891 Credit: C. Howk & B. Savage (Wisconsin);
Interstellar Dust-Bunnies of NGC 891 Credit: C. Howk & B. Savage (Wisconsin);
Hubble. Credit: R. Williams (STScI), the Hubble Deep Field-South Team, and NASA
Hubble. Credit: R. Williams (STScI), the Hubble Deep Field-South Team, and NASA
Dumbell. Credit & (c): Michael Pierce (Indiana U.) et al., WIYN, AURA, NOAO, NSF
Dumbell. Credit & (c): Michael Pierce (Indiana U.) et al., WIYN, AURA, NOAO, NSF
Abell 39.    (c): George Jacoby (WIYN Obs.) et al., WIYN, AURA, NOAO, NSF
Abell 39. (c): George Jacoby (WIYN Obs.) et al., WIYN, AURA, NOAO, NSF
Bubbling. Credit: Jeffrey Kenney (Yale) et al., WFPC2, HST NASA
Bubbling. Credit: Jeffrey Kenney (Yale) et al., WFPC2, HST NASA

Mailing Address

Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics
Physics Department
P.O. Box 208120
New Haven, CT 06520-8120

Campus Address

260 Whitney Avenue
454 J.W. Gibbs Laboratory

Telephone: (203) 432-3392

Fax: 203) 432-3824

E-mail: ycaa@yale.edu

Upcoming YCAA Seminars

Syndicate content
Updated: 5 hours 59 min ago

Nuclear Particle Astrophysics (NPA) Seminar: Abigail Crites, "Probing the Early Universe: Innovative Approaches in Millimeter Wavelength Cosmology" - Thu, February 18, 2016

5 hours 59 min ago
When: Thursday, February 18, 2016 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
Tags: astrophysics, nuclear_physics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Abigail Crites

Description: Some of the most intriguing questions in cosmology today relate to the earliest epochs of the universe: the inflationary epoch and the epoch of reionization. Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) have provided important information about the physics of our universe and many breakthroughs have occurred in recent years shedding light on inflation; however, measurements of the inflation itself have yet to be made.

The epoch of reionization, in contrast, is as yet largely unexplored and many basic questions remain open such as: When did reionization occur? What was the duration of reionization? And what sources caused reionization? Despite their differences, these two epochs can be studied by similar instrument techniques. I am working to leverage instrumental breakthroughs developed to study the CMB to probe the epoch of reionization.

I will discuss a new technique and a new instrument, TIME-Pilot, specifically designed to study the epoch of reionization with a novel line intensity mapping technique that leverages mm-wavelength technology developed to study the CMB. This cryogenic instrument is a pathfinder for a new technique for studying the EoR through intensity mapping of the 157.7 um ionized carbon ([CII]) emission line. Specifically it is designed to detect [CII] clustering fluctuations and test the predicted [CII] amplitudes of faint emission from the earliest dwarf galaxies.

I will also describe the ongoing work in the CMB community to probe inflation and other fundamental physics and specifically my work on the South Pole Telescope. I will present our recent results from the 100 square degree survey (the first year of data) focusing on the high signal-to-noise measurement of the E-mode and temperature-E-mode correlation CMB power spectra, and B-mode power spectra, and measurements of the gravitational lensing potential and discuss the progress towards future results that constrain theories of inflation.

Contact Information:
   Danielle Heller
   
   danielle.heller@yale.edu
   http://physics.yale.edu

Nuclear Particle Astrophysics (NPA) Seminar: Danny Jacobs, "Opening the 21cm Universe with the MWA, PAPER, HERA, and Beyond" - Thu, February 11, 2016

Thu, 02/11/2016 - 7:39am
When: Thursday, February 11, 2016 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
Tags: astrophysics, nuclear_physics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Danny Jacobs

Description: Direct observation of hydrogen produced during the big bang is possible via the
redshifted 21cm line. Visible throughout the cosmic time-line the 21 cm line traces matter and energy evolution and is now being pursued as a cosmological and astrophysical probe. Experimental low frequency radio arrays are currently working towards detection and characterization of this spectral line signal during the Epoch of Reionization, when the first objects heated and then ionized hydrogen half a billion years after the big bang. Power spectra from this time period are providing first constraints on the physics of the first stars and galaxies as well as a direct measure tau, the optical depth to the Cosmic Microwave Background, one of the largest remaining uncertainties in the standard cosmological model. Here I present the latest results from several experimental arrays and introduce the next generation Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) which will yield 20 times
the sensitivity of first generation arrays. I will discuss the latest advancements in instrument simulation, design and calibration as well as analysis techniques in an era of big data.

Contact Information:
   Danielle Heller
   
   danielle.heller@yale.edu
   http://physics.yale.edu

YCAA Seminar: "Disentangling redshift-space distortions and nonlinear bias using large scale structure dynamics", Elise Jennings, KICP - Chicago - Tue, February 9, 2016

Tue, 02/09/2016 - 7:06am
When: Tuesday, February 9, 2016 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Where:
   Watson, A-51
   60 Sachem Street, New Haven, CT 06511
Tags: astrophysics, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Elise Jennings, KICP - Chicago

Description: The distortion of clustering due to the peculiar motions of galaxies and the apparent scale of characteristic features in the galaxy distribution are key tests of cosmic acceleration. I will discuss some of the current challenges in modeling redshift space distortions in large scale clustering statistics, at the percent level required by future galaxy redshift surveys. This will require us to re-consider the scales at which linear perturbation theory is applicable, the impact of stochasticity on defining a linear growth rate and nonlinear velocity-density correlations. I will present a new approach using the information content along different lines of sight to isolate the impact of nonlinear growth and redshift space distortions. I will also discuss a new framework for cosmological parameter estimation, CosmoSIS, designed to connect together, share, and advance development of inference tools across the community.

Open To: General Public

Nuclear Particle Astrophysics (NPA) Seminar: Diana Parno, University of Washington, "Unmasking the Neutrino: The Standard Model and Beyond" - Thu, February 4, 2016

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 7:13am
When: Thursday, February 4, 2016 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
Tags: astrophysics, nuclear_physics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Diana Parno, University of Washington

Description: When nonzero neutrino mass was definitively established some fifteen years ago, these neutral, spin-1/2 elementary particles gave us the first hard evidence of beyond-the-Standard-Model physics in the electroweak sector. Today, many fundamental questions about neutrinos remain. In this talk, I will discuss two exciting projects, COHERENT and KATRIN, that will measure neutrino properties and probe the edges of the Standard Model. The COHERENT experiment plans to make the first unambiguous measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering, a predicted Standard Model process and an important background source for WIMP dark-matter searches. Meanwhile, through a precise measurement of the endpoint region of the tritium beta spectrum, the KATRIN experiment will achieve a direct neutrino-mass scale sensitivity of 0.2 eV at the 90% confidence level. I will emphasize two particular contributions to KATRIN's sensitivity goals: the molecular physics of the T2 source, and the detection of signal electrons at the far end of the 70m beamline. Both KATRIN and COHERENT will explore potential physics topics beyond the Standard Model, from non-standard neutrino interactions, to Lorentz-invariance violation, to sterile neutrinos. Unmasking the neutrino will do more than fill in gaps: it may be a key to mysteries beyond.

Contact Information:
   Danielle Heller
   
   danielle.heller@yale.edu
   http://physics.yale.edu

YCAA Seminar: "Emerging Worlds: Signposts of Active Planet Formation" - Sally Dodson-Robinson, University of Delaware - Tue, February 2, 2016

Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:35am
When: Tuesday, February 2, 2016 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Where:
   Watson, A-51
   60 Sachem Street, New Haven, CT 06511
Tags: astrophysics, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Sally Dodson-Robinson

Description: With ALMA in full production and JWST soon to launch, observations of still-forming planets embedded in protostellar disks are soon to come. Yet JWST observing time will be expensive, and ALMA can only detect a planet's influence on nearby gas and dust, rather than the planet's photosphere. I will discuss a set of markers that can pre-select promising exoplanet-hosting candidate disks for detailed observing campaigns. I will begin by demonstrating that the subset of accreting transitional disks with wide, optically thin inner holes of 15 AU or more can only be sculpted by multiple planets orbiting inside each hole. Next, I will present models of infrared and submillimeter emission from second-generation collisional dust created by a Jupiter-mass planet perturbing a gas+planetesimal disk. Synthetic images from our numerical simulations show a bright double ring at 850 μm for a low-eccentricity planet, whereas a high-eccentricity planet would produce a characteristic inner ring with asymmetries in the disk. In the presence of first generation primordial dust these markers would be difficult to detect, but they would be observable in a transitional disk with a mature planetesimal population. Finally, the properties of the planet-forming midplanes of protostellar disks remain largely unprobed by observations due to the high optical depth of dust and of commonly observed molecules such as CO and H2O. I will discuss a chemical model of an evolving T-Tauri disk that predicts the optical depths of rotational transitions of 13C16O, 12C17O and 12C18O. The optical depths of low-order rotational lines of C17O are around unity, which suggests it may be possible to see into active planet-forming midplanes using C17O. With our computed C17O/H2 abundance ratio, such ALMA observations would provide estimates of the gas mass available for planet formation.

Open To: General Public

Nuclear Particle Astrophysics (NPA) Seminar: Laura Newburgh, University of Toronto, "New Probes of Old Structure: Cosmology with 21cm Intensity Mapping and the Cosmic Microwave Background" - Thu, January 28, 2016

Thu, 01/28/2016 - 7:16am
When: Thursday, January 28, 2016 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
Tags: astrophysics, nuclear_physics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Laura Newburgh, University of Toronto

Description: Current cosmological measurements have left us with deep questions about our Universe: What caused the expansion of the Universe at the earliest times? How did structure form? What is Dark Energy and does it evolve with time? New experiments like CHIME, HIRAX, and ACTPol are poised to address these questions through 3-dimensional maps of structure and measurements of the polarized Cosmic Microwave Background. In this talk, I will describe how we will use 21cm intensity measurements from CHIME and HIRAX to place sensitive constraints on Dark Energy between redshifts 0.8 -- 2.5, a poorly probed era corresponding to when Dark Energy began to impact the expansion history of the Universe. I will also discuss how we will use data from new instruments on the ACT telescope to constrain cosmological parameters like the total neutrino mass and probe structure at late times.

Contact Information:
   Danielle Heller
   
   danielle.heller@yale.edu
   http://physics.yale.edu

Nuclear Particle Astrophysics (NPA) Seminar, David Lopez Mateos, Harvard University, "Standard Model and New Physics in the Higgs Sector: The New Precision Era" - Wed, January 27, 2016

Wed, 01/27/2016 - 6:54am
When: Wednesday, January 27, 2016 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
   Enter building through Wright Lab-West (268 Whitney). All other external doors are locked or blocked by construction.
Tags: astrophysics, nuclear_physics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk


Description: The discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC in 2012 culminated many decades of work and theoretical speculation. Its sheer discovery has not only ruled out many other theories of EW symmetry breaking, but also given it a mass and a set of properties. The measurement of these properties has wide-ranging implications across different fields in fundamental physics and provides a unique window into new physics. In this talk, I will discuss the state-of-the-art experimental results on the Higgs sector, coming from an extensive analysis of the LHC Run 1 data. These results include direct constraints on beyond the Standard Model (BSM) realizations of the Higgs sector, as well as indirect constraints on popular BSM theories. I will then focus on how ATLAS prepared for early searches and precision physics on the onset of Run 2, and how to make the most of the Run 2 data to map the Higgs sector. I will conclude discussing projections on the improvements in our understanding of this new sector that can be achieved at the HL-LHC and the hardware and event reconstruction challenges that need to be overcome for this purpose.

Open To: Yale Community Only
Contact Information:
   Kyungeun Lim
   
   kyungeun.lim@yale.edu
   

YCAA Seminar: Jeremiah Murphy, Florida State University, "Solutions for Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions" - Tue, January 26, 2016

Tue, 01/26/2016 - 7:18am
When: Tuesday, January 26, 2016 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Where:
   Watson, A-51
   60 Sachem Street, New Haven, CT 06511
Tags: astrophysics, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Jeremiah Murphy, Florida State University

Description: Core-collapse supernovae are some of the most energetic events in the Universe; they herald the birth of neutron stars and black holes, are a major site for nucleosynthesis, influence galactic hydrodynamics, trigger further star formation, and are prodigious emitters of neutrinos and gravitational waves. Though these explosions play an important and multifaceted role in many cosmic phenomena, the details of the explosion mechanism have remained elusive for many decades. The fundamental challenge of core-collapse theory is to understand what makes the difference between a fizzled result and successful explosions. In this talk, I will discuss the theoretical conditions for successful explosions.

Open To: General Public

Nuclear Particle Astrophysics (NPA) Seminar: Tom Essinger-Hileman, Johns Hopkins University, "Searching for the Signature Inflation in CMB Polarization: the ABS and CLASS experiments" - Thu, January 21, 2016

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 7:22am
When: Thursday, January 21, 2016 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
Tags: astrophysics, nuclear_physics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Tom Essinger-Hileman, Johns Hopkins University

Description: The cosmic microwave background (CMB) offers a unique glimpse into the state of the young universe, providing a wealth of information about its structure and constituents. CMB polarization also provides a window onto the first moments after the Big Bang through its sensitivity to inflationary gravitational waves, which leave a distinctive curl (B mode) component in the CMB polarization. I will describe two experiments based in the Atacama Desert of Chile that aim to measure B modes: (1) the Atacama B--‐Mode Search (ABS) operated for three seasons with ongoing data analysis yielding new cosmological constraints soon; and (2) the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS), a multi--‐frequency array of telescopes that is unique in aiming to measure the B mode signal on the largest angular scales from the ground. CLASS will also make cosmic--‐variance--‐limited measurements of large--‐scale E mode polarization, improving constraints on the redshift of reionization and the sum of the neutrino masses. Measuring and characterizing B mode polarization would provide confirmation that inflation occurred, our first evidence of quantum gravitational effects, and a probe of physics at grand--‐unified theory (GUT) energy scales. I will review the observational challenges in making these measurements and prospects for the future.

Contact Information:
   Danielle Heller
   
   danielle.heller@yale.edu
   http://physics.yale.edu

YCAA Seminar: "Galaxy Cluster Evolution Over the Past 10 Billion Years" - Michael McDonald, MIT Kavli Institute - Tue, January 19, 2016

Tue, 01/19/2016 - 7:04am
When: Tuesday, January 19, 2016 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Where:
   Watson, A-51
   60 Sachem Street, New Haven, CT 06511
Tags: astrophysics, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Michael McDonald, MIT Kavli Institute

Description: Galaxy Cluster Evolution Over the Past 10 Billion Years

In this talk, I will summarize recent results from the South Pole Telescope 2500 deg^2 survey. This mass-limited survey has discovered hundreds of new galaxy clusters at 0 < z < 1.7, allowing an unprecedented view of galaxy cluster evolution. Using follow-up observations from Spitzer, Hubble, Chandra, XMM-Newton, Magellan, VLT, ALMA, ATCA, and Gemini, we are able to study the evolution of the stars, gas, and dark matter in these massive systems. Based on these data, we constrain the evolution of cluster galaxies, the central AGN, the cooling ICM, the heavy metal abundance of the ICM, the dynamical state of the cluster, and various other cluster properties. Looking forward, I will present several new and ongoing surveys which will dramatically change the landscape of galaxy cluster research in coming years.

Open To: General Public

Nuclear Particle Astrophysics (NPA) Seminar, Benjamin Monreal, University of California, Santa Barbara, "The second century of astroparticle experiments" - Thu, December 17, 2015

Thu, 12/17/2015 - 8:31am
When: Thursday, December 17, 2015 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
   Enter building through Wright Lab-West (268 Whitney). All other external doors are locked or blocked by construction.
Tags: astrophysics, nuclear_physics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Benjamin Monreal, University of California, Santa Barbara

Description: We study neutrinos and dark matter, in many cases, using "scaled up" versions of very old technologies. Our liquid-scintillator tanks have grown from ton-scale to kiloton-scale; our germanium diodes have grown from hundreds of grams to hundreds of kilograms. However, many such technologies may reach their "final" affordable scales in the next ten or fifteen years. I will discuss two examples of new technologies with at least a possibility of a longer outlook.

In neutrino physics, the Project 8 experiment is seeking to use radiofrequency electron cyclotron spectroscopy to measure a very large number of tritium decay electrons. From the shape of this spectrum, we can extract or constrain the mass of the neutrino. I will show our recent proof-of-concept electron detection results, and argue how this technique can scale-up dramatically differently than "classical" spectrometers, and its future sensitivity to the neutrino mass.

Separately, I will show some recent work on ultra-large time projection chambers (TPCs). Beyond the upcoming generation of argon and xenon TPCs, detectors at larger scales---or using other gases---appear only murkily plausible or affordable. I will discuss my recent work on new concepts for building affordable, scalable TPCs using new gas mixtures and a new concept for underground lab space in salt formations, and their use for neutrino, dark matter, proton decay, and other studies.

Open To: Yale Community Only
Contact Information:
   Karsten Heeger
   
   karsten.heeger@yale.edu
   

YCAA Seminar: Eileen Meyer - University of Maryland, Baltimore County, "The Chandra X-ray Jet Puzzle: Missing gamma-rays and a new TeV source class?" - Tue, December 15, 2015

Tue, 12/15/2015 - 7:21am
When: Tuesday, December 15, 2015 2:30 PM
Where:
   Watson, A-51
   60 Sachem St., New Haven, CT 06511
Tags: astrophysics, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Eileen Meyer - University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Description: I will present recent work showing that contrary to long-running belief, the anomalously high X-ray flux from some kpc-scale quasar jets is not due to inverse Compton upscattering of the Cosmic Microwave Background (IC/CMB). The IC/CMB model posits a near-Eddington power and still-highly-relativistic jet (Gamma ~ 10-20) at kpc scales and predicts a steady gamma-ray emission which is not seen in at least two cases, 3C 273 and PKS 0637-752 (Meyer et al., 2014, Meyer et al., 2015). I will discuss the seemingly only viable remaining explanation for the X-ray flux, which is synchrotron radiation from a second population of electrons accelerated in situ up to TeV energies. The inevitable result of such a population is to produce a significant flux of TeV photons via the inescapable IC/CMB process, which should lead to quasar jets being a more significant source of TeV photons in the Universe than the canonical ‘TeV Blazar’ class of BL Lacs. I will briefly discuss the possible cosmological implications of these findings and future directions for this work.

Open To: General Public

Nuclear Particle Astrophysics (NPA) Seminar, Mark G. Alford, Washington University, "Phase conversion dissipation at the quark/nuclear matter interface" - Thu, December 10, 2015

Thu, 12/10/2015 - 7:52am
When: Thursday, December 10, 2015 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
   Enter building through Wright Lab-West (268 Whitney). All other external doors are locked or blocked by construction.
Tags: astrophysics, nuclear_physics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Mark G. Alford, Washington University

Description: Quark matter may exist in the cores of neutron stars, where gravity compresses matter to the highest densities attained in nature. I will discuss an interesting feature of stars with a quark matter core: heavy damping of density oscillations arising from periodic conversion
between nuclear matter and quark matter. I will show that this process can have a dramatic effect on known oscillatory modes, and could therefore provide a signature of the presence of quark matter.

Open To: Yale Community Only
Contact Information:
   Eliane Epple
   
   eliane.epple@yale.edu
   

Special Seminar: Roahn Wynar, FBI, "The Einstein FBI File. On the trail of the world's most important pacifist" - Wed, December 9, 2015

Wed, 12/09/2015 - 7:02am
When: Wednesday, December 9, 2015 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
   Enter building through Wright Lab-West (268 Whitney). All other external doors are locked or blocked by construction.
Tags: astrophysics, atomic_physics, condensed_matter, cosmology, nuclear_physics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Roahn Wynar, FBI

Description: A modern look at Albert Einstein's 1500 page FBI file; the purpose, intent and contents of the file; how it illustrates institutional and cultural changes in how the FBI of today functions and what the FBI is looking for.

Before joining the FBI, Roahn Wynar received a Ph.D. in Atomic Physics from the University of Texas at Austin. He then held a postdoctoral position at the University of Washington from 2000 - 2003.

Open To: Yale Community Only
Contact Information:
   Reina Maruyama
   
   reina.maruyama@yale.edu
   

Nuclear Particle Astrophysics (NPA) Seminar, Michael Hass, Weizmann Institute, "Astrophysical nuclear reactions from Big Bang Nuclear Synthesis to Solar Physics and Solar Neutrinos" - Wed, December 9, 2015

Wed, 12/09/2015 - 7:02am
When: Wednesday, December 9, 2015 12:00 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
   Enter building through Wright Lab-West (268 Whitney). All other external doors are locked or blocked by construction.
Tags: astrophysics, nuclear_physics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Michael Hass, Weizmann Institute

Description: The study of nuclear reactions that are relevant to astrophysical issues plays a central role in the basic understanding of various astrophysical phenomena and of the origin of the elements. In particular, high-precision studies of solar fusion reactions at low energy, using stable nuclear beams, shed light on the energy generation in the Sun, on Solar models and on the issue of solar neutrinos and neutrino oscillations.

In the last 10 years our group has focused on such studies of two central cases, the 4He(3He,g)7Be and the 7Be(p,gamma)8B reactions. The former one also plays a major role in Big-Bang Nucleo-synthesis calculations and in the cosmic 7Li abundance problem. There has been significant progress in this field, resulting in a very good understanding of the relevant reactions, but yet more information is needed and is being produced in order to probe these issues with increased detail and precision.

The talk will summarize the present status of this field and present new results from experiments in Madrid and TRIUMF.

Some points regarding experiments with radioactive beams for issues of “explosive nucleo-synthesis” will also be discussed.

Open To: Yale Community Only
Contact Information:
   Moshe Gail
   
   moshe.gai@yale.edu
   

YCAA Seminar: Benny Trakhtenbrot - ETH Zurich, "Tracing the origins of the relations between super-massive black holes and their host galaxies" - Tue, December 8, 2015

Tue, 12/08/2015 - 7:42am
When: Tuesday, December 8, 2015 2:30 PM
Where:
   Watson, A-51
   60 Sachem St, New Haven, CT 06511
Tags: astrophysics, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Benny Trakhtenbrot

Description: "Tracing the origins of the relations between super-massive black holes and their host galaxies"

In the local Universe, super-massive black holes (SMBHs) are observed to be closely linked to their host galaxies. In this talk I will address the co-evolution of SMBHs and their hosts, from the local Universe, out to z~4. Several observational studies suggest that SMBH growth generally precedes that of the stellar population in the host. Among these, I will present new results from a Keck campaign, that establish this picture at z~3.5. In particular, some objects show extremely high BH-to-host mass ratios, more than an order of magnitude higher than in the local Universe. A rich collection of multi-wavelength data demonstrates that SMBH-related feedback does not necessarily affect the host galaxies.
I will argue that a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between the evolution of SMBHs and galaxies requires high-resolution sub-mm observations with ALMA, some of which we have already obtained.

Open To: General Public

Nuclear Particle Astrophysics (NPA) Seminar, Louise Suter, Argonne National Laboratory, "First Oscillation Results from the NOvA Experiment" - Thu, December 3, 2015

Thu, 12/03/2015 - 7:12am
When: Thursday, December 3, 2015 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
   Enter building through Wright Lab-West (268 Whitney). All other external doors are locked or blocked by construction.
Tags: astrophysics, nuclear_physics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Louise Suter, Argonne National Laboratory

Description: The NOvA long-baseline neutrino experiment consists of two highly active, finely segmented, liquid scintillator detectors located 14.6 mrad off Fermilab's NuMI beam. It consists of a Near Detector located at Fermilab, and a Far Detector located in Ash River, MI, 810 km from
the neutrino source. I will present NOvA’s first neutrino oscillation results, including an analysis of both the rate of electron neutrino appearing and the rate of muon neutrinos disappearing in the NuMI beam. The measurement of the electron neutrino appearance rate
provides NOvA with sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering and the amount of CP violation in the neutrino sector.

Open To: Yale Community Only
Contact Information:
   Kyungeun Lim
   
   kyungeun.lim@yale.edu
   

YCAA Seminar: Tim Brandt - Institute for Advanced Study, "MW GeV excess" - Tue, December 1, 2015

Tue, 12/01/2015 - 7:50am
When: Tuesday, December 1, 2015 2:30 PM
Where:
   Watson, A-51
   60 Sachem St., New Haven, CT 06511
Tags: astrophysics, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Tim Brandt - Institute for Advanced Study

Description: Title and abstract to be added...

Open To: General Public

Nuclear Particle Astrophysics (NPA) Seminar, Lijuan Ruan, Brookhaven National Laboratory, "Electron-Positron Tomography of Hot and Dense Medium Created in Heavy Ion Collisions" - Fri, November 20, 2015

Fri, 11/20/2015 - 8:35am
When: Friday, November 20, 2015 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
   Enter building through Wright Lab-West (268 Whitney). All other external doors are locked or blocked by construction.
Tags: astrophysics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Lijuan Ruan, Brookhaven National Laboratory

Description: Electron-positron pairs are penetrating probes of Quark-Gluon Plasma created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. They can provide information deep into the system and early time.

In heavy ion collisions, we use electron-positron tomography to search for signatures of chiral symmetry restoration and study the temperature and lifetime of hot, dense medium.

In this talk, I will review recent results and discuss future perspectives.

Open To: Yale Community Only
Contact Information:
   Li Yi
   
   l.yi@yale.edu
   

Nuclear Particle Astrophysics (NPA) Seminar, Roy Lacey, Stony Brook University, "Indications for a Critical Point in the Phase Diagram for Hot and Dense Nuclear Matter" - Thu, November 19, 2015

Thu, 11/19/2015 - 9:23am
When: Thursday, November 19, 2015 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Where:
   Wright Lab, EAL 108 Conference Room (EAL108)
   268 Whitney Avenue, New Haven 06520
   (Location is wheelchair accessible)
   Enter building through Wright Lab-West (268 Whitney). All other external doors are locked or blocked by construction.
Tags: astrophysics, nuclear_physics, particle_theory, science, seminar, talk

Speaker/Performer: Roy Lacey, Stony Brook University

Description: An essential goal of the heavy ion experimental programs at RHIC and the LHC, is the mapping of the QCD phase diagram. Pinpointing the location of the phase boundaries and the critical end point (CEP), in the temperature versus baryon chemical potential (T,µB) plane of the nuclear matter phase diagram, is key for this mapping.

I will discuss a recent attempt to locate the CEP via a Dynamic Finite-Size Scaling (DFSS) analysis of the non-monotonic excitation functions for the Gaussian emission source radii difference [(Rout)2 - (Rside)2] obtained from two-pion interferometry measurements in Au+Au (√sNN =7.7–200 GeV) and Pb+Pb (√sNN=2.76 TeV) collisions.

The analysis indicates a second order phase transition at the CEP, with the estimates Tcep ~165 MeV and µBcep ~95 MeV for its location. The critical exponents (ν ~0.66 and γ ~1.2) extracted via the same DFSS analysis, place this CEP in the 3D Ising model universality class.

Open To: Yale Community Only
Contact Information:
   Li Yi
   
   l.yi@yale.edu